Is it time to move out?

You’ve finally finished your degree at university and the only choice you have left is to go back home, it’s time to move out and find a job. But there’s just one slight problem…you can’t go back to living at home and scrounging from your parents.

The last time you were at home was 3 years ago; right after you finished your A Levels. You’ve now been independent for a few years and so returning back to the cool kids’ lair you used to have in your parent’s attic is not a possibility, and it for sure isn’t very “cool” anymore.

There’s only one path you can take… and it’s of course a very dreaded, dark, and dusty one move to a new place.

RENT

The word just oozes unreliability, but what with the prices for renting apartments continuing to soar and the recession just hitting its peak, there’s no other choice. You don’t have a stable job, never mind any savings; you’re double-figures in debt!

So how can you manage to juggle the responsibilities of living on your own whilst at the same time managing your costs?

  1. Intake or outtake?

You have finally found a considerably well-paid job. Mind you, it should be  considering you’ve spent the last 3 years studying a subject you’d hoped to be the least bit useful. But now comes the time to take it seriously. Get straight onto buying that A5 Pukka Jotta Pad because you’ve got finances to sort out.

  • How much money are you bringing in – Net.
  • What is your monthly expenditure – Necessities.
  • How much will you have left for savings – You’ll need it on a rainy day.
  1. Do I want it, or do I need it?

Now you’ve got all the numbers down neatly on paper in front of you. You can see that you don’t have very much left after your monthly spending and the number you’ve put under “savings” seems so small. So your thinking, why would I ever need a £20 note? Well boys and girls, you’ll soon learn.

It turns out you’ve underestimated your monthly spending after all, this is the first time that you’re completely independent and responsible for yourself. ??

So before you go spending that £20 on a new bag, or a new leather iPhone case – think, do I want it… or do I need it?

  1. Mum’s furniture

While you’re still daddy’s little girl or mummy’s boy you should take advantage of the extra set of sofas. You’ll wish you did when you’re sitting alone on your cold wooden floors, of which aren’t even real – they’re laminated!

Don’t be afraid of hand-outs, everybody needs a little help every once in a while.

  1. An extra kettle? Sure mum, I’d be more than glad of it.

Moving into a new place for the first time can be scary, so if you have the privilege to get a few things here and there, your pocket will thank you later.

With rising prices ranging from water, electricity, rent, to food, you’ll need every extra penny just-in-case.

So here are the 3 steps to maintaining a comfortable new start to your life. You’ve learnt to manage the numbers; you didn’t need an accountant for that, did you?  You’ve also learnt that you may regret buying a “want”, as well as being grateful for everything that you receive. So rent carefully – it doesn’t have to be in Central London. Spend wisely; sometimes value meals are valued, and of course appreciate what you’re given – other people may wish for what you have.

Related posts

Why is artificial grass beneficial to your property?

Artifitial grass benefitsArtificial grass is a desirable asset for your property…

Read More

Clean your carpet using these helpful tips

vacuuming dirt off a green carpet

Carpeting throughout…

Read More

End Of Tenancy Cleaning for your London flat

If you are in the process of changing your London Flat, the end of tenancy cleaning can be a nightmare, especially…

Read More

Search

October 2020

  • M
  • T
  • W
  • T
  • F
  • S
  • S
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
  • 6
  • 7
  • 8
  • 9
  • 10
  • 11
  • 12
  • 13
  • 14
  • 15
  • 16
  • 17
  • 18
  • 19
  • 20
  • 21
  • 22
  • 23
  • 24
  • 25
  • 26
  • 27
  • 28
  • 29
  • 30
  • 31

November 2020

  • M
  • T
  • W
  • T
  • F
  • S
  • S
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
  • 6
  • 7
  • 8
  • 9
  • 10
  • 11
  • 12
  • 13
  • 14
  • 15
  • 16
  • 17
  • 18
  • 19
  • 20
  • 21
  • 22
  • 23
  • 24
  • 25
  • 26
  • 27
  • 28
  • 29
  • 30
Couple?
Amenities

Compare listings

Compare